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CabinetConstructionBrough
Cabinet Construction
The Woodworker Series, Evans Bros., London edited by J. C. S. Brough
1930

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"This book deals exhaustively and in a thoroughly practical way with all methods of cabinet construction. Each detail is treated in a way that will guide the reader through it's construction in any size and in any style. The volume enables the woodworker to tackle successfully any design of which he has the scale drawings or even the dimensional sketch. Fully illustrated with over 300 drawings."

Cabinet Construction was compiled and edited by J. C. S. Brough, Editor of The Woodworker journal.

  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: The Toolemera Press (October 30, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 9780983150022
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches

Introduction by Gary Roberts

“This book deals exhaustively and in a thoroughly practical way with all methods of cabinet construction. Each detail is treated in a way that will guide the reader through it’s construction in any size and in any style. The volume enables the woodworker to tackle successfully any design of which he has the scale drawing or even the dimensioned sketch. Fully illustrated with over 300 drawings.” From the dust jacket flyleaf.

Cabinet Construction

An earlier edition of this book was published under the title Details Of Cabinet Construction. Cabinet Construction, c1920. This, the later edition, c1930, features larger and more detailed drawings as well as additional descriptions of various woodworking processes.

Evans Bros., London, publishers of The Woodworker Magazine, offered a variety of books in The Woodworker Series. J. C. S. Brough (James Carruthers Smith Brough) served as editor of this hugely popular series.

Coming at the end of the Manual Arts education period, The Woodworker Series addressed the functional processes of working wood at a time when those who practiced the craft were passing. Fortunately for the woodworker of today, Evans Bros. preserved these first hand accounts of hand tool woodworking.

Manual Arts and the Arts & Crafts Period

The Arts & Crafts Period in North America (often known as Craftsman style) was a predominant design aesthetic from the end of the 19th Century on through the beginning of the 20th Century. At the same time, the influence of the Manual Arts movement on educational theory and practice was peaking. Manual Arts, the predecessor to Vocational Education, emphasized the importance of craft in the intellectual, social and physical development of students of both genders.

Often deceptively simple in appearance, but complex in the visual and practical interactions of the various design elements, Arts & Crafts style furnishings represented a departure from the excessive ornamentation of the Gothic, Eastlake, Victorian and Arte Nouveau periods. Manual Arts educators applied the design and process elements of the Arts & Crafts ethos to the requirements of curriculum development: the item created should be doable by students possessed of increasing skill levels as well as being an object which could be put to use in every day life, thereby enhancing the relationships between craft, intellect, and society.